Ajuy, the delightful tiny fishing village in Fuerteventura that hides big treasures

    Ajuy, the delightful tiny fishing village in Fuerteventura that hides big treasures | Macaronesia Fuerteventura

    If we talk about Fuerteventura, we immediately visualise spectacular and heavenly beaches where to get lost, fall in love with and enjoy the nature in its purest form. Still, Fuerteventura is much more than beaches. The island offers wonderful volcanic landscapes. One of them, with a great scenic value, is the setting of the delightful seaside village of Ajuy.

    Located in the municipality of Pájara, on the west and wildest coast, Ajuy is a welcoming and peaceful must-visit place in Fuerteventura for the great value of the treasures hidden in the area.

    Ajuy Natural Monument

    Ajuy’s most outstanding attraction is its natural caves, that were declared a Natural Monument in 1987. Located in the Rural Park of Betancuria, they are protected for their high natural value and their impressive beauty.

    These caves, which are over a hundred centuries old, represent the most ancient formations in the Canary Islands and they are one of the 150 places with major geological importance in the world. The path to the caves starts from the beach of Ajuy and it is a 500-metre walk where visitors can understand the geology of the island.

    Ajuy Natural Monument | Fuerteventura Macaronesia

    Ajuy, a delightful seaside village

    Besides its caves, the fishing village of Ajuy attracts visitors for its charm and position: far away from hotel complexes, it offers a relaxing visit for you to pause and rest. Ajuy is oriented towards the sea, close to a ravine and a nice black sand beach, Playa de los Muertos, that leads to a truly wild coast. It is one of the few black sand beaches in Fuerteventura and it reminds us of the volcanic origins of the Canary Islands.

    Ajuy un encantador pueblo pesquero que esconde grandes tesoros | Macaronesia Fuerteventura
    ©asialasowska (instagram)

    Another secret of Ajuy

    Jean de Béthencourt, the famous Norman conqueror of the Canary Islands, took Lanzarote, Fuerteventura and El Hierro at the beginning of 15th century and started the conquest right from Ajuy. Béthencourt received the title of King of the Canary Islands from the Kings of Castile. Béthencourt also founded Betancuria, the old capital city of Fuerteventura, towards the inland and not too far from Ajuy. This is no doubt another place with great historical and cultural importance and it has been considered one of the nicest villages in Spain.

    After an interesting stroll along the coast, a good jump in the waters of Playa de los Muertos and some sheer delight in the amazing natural landscape of this charming village, do not forget to have a meal break. Ajuy’s cuisine, based on local fresh fish, is a great gift for your senses and it is a superb way to honour a very special visit or excursion.

    Qué ver en Fuerteventura: Ajuy, playa de arena negra | Macaronesia FuerteventuraAjuy, a delightful seaside village | Macaronesia Fuerteventura